Reusing CO2

When we think about global climate change and the warming of our planet, we tend to think about pollution, specifically greenhouse gas emissions from transit, power plants, or industrial sources.  A typical next step has been finding ways to curb emissions.  National Geographic published an article looking at just the opposite, suggesting it might be easier if we instead find ways to capture the excess carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere. 
Physicist Klaus Lackner of Columbia University is working on an idea involving a plastic resin that would capture CO2 from automobiles and planes.  The end goal is an economical, efficient, and practical operation that would not only capture CO2, but also store it underground.
The idea above, known as carbon capture storage (CSS), is an emerging technique when applied to power plants.  So much so, that the United States Department of Energy (DOE) is working on finding ways to reuse the captured carbon.  Just a couple of weeks ago, the DOE awarded $106 million in federal funds for six projects.  These experiments will look at the possibility of reusing captured CO2 for things like fuels, plastics, cement, and fertilizer.  For now, cost remains a major sticking point. 
 There is a variety of information on the web concerning carbon capture and storage.  Check out the links below to get started!
Read On:
New Ways to Scrub out the Carbon
Cutting-edge US carbon capture scheme wins $1B grant
Can injecting carbon emissions underground really be safe?
Carbon capture and storage: how does it work?
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This entry was posted in Climate Change, Energy, Pollution, Renewable Resources and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Reusing CO2

  1. Sara Renshaw says:

    The idea of storing carbon underground is very distrubing to me. Again it seems we are working against Earth’s natural working order. It seems obivious to me that pushing a foregin substance into the Earth’s core will only piss it off more, and force more natural disasters.

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